Photoset

April 19, 2014 at 9:22 PM

chrisozer:

Rog and Bee Walker

for the New York Times NYT Now campaign.

(via lovelylisa22)

Photoset

April 19, 2014 at 9:16 PM

blackmanonthemoon:

karamazove:

New Photos of John Coltrane Rediscovered 50 Years After. They Were Shot. During the recording of A Love Supreme in 1964, Chuck Stewart caught the jazz legend in his element. But 72 photographs from six rolls of film never made it beyond the contact-sheet stage, and so haven’t been published. Stewart’s son David recently rediscovered those images in his father’s collection, and now Stewart is scheduled to include some of them in a donation to the National Museum of American History this month.

Source: Smithsonian.com

King coltrane

(via black-culture)

Photo

April 19, 2014 at 9:13 PM

oscarprgirl:

statuesque. bridal 2015.

oscarprgirl:

statuesque. bridal 2015.

(via afrodesiacworldwide)

Photo

April 19, 2014 at 7:11 PM

unstablefragments:

New Balance 996

unstablefragments:

New Balance 996

(via lastqueen-of)

Photo

April 19, 2014 at 7:04 PM

effedupthoughts:

“I Don’t Apologize For My Blackness and YOUR Fear”
Powerful

effedupthoughts:

“I Don’t Apologize For My Blackness and YOUR Fear”

Powerful

(Source: princessofkings, via theducatednegritaa)

Photo

April 19, 2014 at 3:55 PM

miyabailey:

One of my rose tattoo designs has been entered in @ApothicWine’s Rose Tattoo promotion! Follow the link to vote for me!http://bit.ly/1mjJ560

miyabailey:

One of my rose tattoo designs has been entered in @ApothicWine’s Rose Tattoo promotion! Follow the link to vote for me!http://bit.ly/1mjJ560

Link

April 19, 2014 at 3:21 PM

This School Struggled With Detentions, So They Asked For Students' Help. Guess What? It's Working. →

chescaleigh:

Well look at that! Listening to students actually works!

(via camiyogaom)

Photoset

April 19, 2014 at 2:53 PM

5centsapound:

A photographer and self-proclaimed visual activist, Zanele Muholi explores black lesbian and gay identities and politics in contemporary South Africa. The portraits are at once a visual statement and an archive,” she has said, “marking, mapping, and preserving an often invisible community for posterity.” Muholi’s sensitive portraits challenge the stigma surrounding gays and lesbians in South Africa, debunk the common rhetoric that homosexuality is un-African, and address the preponderance of hate crimes against homosexuals in her native country. 

Artist Statement for “Faces and Phases” (2006-11):

I decided to capture images of my community in order to contribute towards a more democratic and representative South African homosexual history. Up until 1994, we as black lesbians were excluded from participating in the creation of a formal queer movement and our voices were missing from the pages of gay publications, while white gay activists directed the movement and wrote about gay issues and struggles. Hence, few of us were present in the forefront, but many operated underground.

I embarked on a journey of visual activism to ensure that there is black lesbian visibility, to showcase our existence and resistance in this democratic society, to present a positive imagery of black lesbians.

Aside from the dictionary definition of what a ‘face’ is (the front of the head, from forehead to chin), the face also expresses the person. For me, Faces means me, photographer and community worker, being face to face with the many lesbians I interacted with from different Gauteng townships such as Alexandra, Soweto, Vosloorus, Katlehong, Kagiso…

In each township there are lesbians living openly regardless of the stigma and homophobia attached to their lesbian identity, both butch and femme. Most of the time being lesbian is seen as negative, as destroying the nuclear heterosexual family; for many black lesbians, the stigma of queer identity arises from the fact that homosexuality is seen as un-African. Expectations are that African women must have children and procreate with a male partner, the head of the family. That is part of the ‘African tradition’.

Failing to conform to these expectations, we are perceived as deviants, needing a ‘curative rape’ to erase our male attitude and make us into true women, females, real women, mothers, men’s property.

Individuals in this series of photographs hold different positions and play many different roles within the black lesbian community: soccer player, actress, scholar, cultural activist, lawyer, dancer, film maker, human rights/gender activist. However, each time we are represented by outsiders, we are merely seen as victims of rape and homophobia. Our lives are always sensationalized, rarely understood. This is the reason for Phases: our lives are not just what makes the newspapers headlines every time one of us is attacked. We go through many stages, we express many identities, which unfold in parallel in our existence.

From an insider’s perspective, this project is meant as a commemoration and a celebration of the lives of black lesbians that I met in my journeys through the townships. Lives and narratives are told with both pain and joy, as some of these women were going through hardships in their lives. Their stories caused me sleepless nights as I did not know how to deal with the urgent needs I was told about. Many of them had been violated; I did not want the camera to be a further violation; rather, I wanted to establish relationships with them based on our mutual understanding of what it means to be female, lesbian and black in South Africa today.I call this method the birth of visual activism: I decided to use it to mark our resistance and existence as black lesbians in our country, because it is important to put a face on each and every issue. via artistsite

In April 2012, thieves broke into Muholi’s Cape Town apartment and stole over 20 hard drives holding years of photographic documentation, suggesting the continued controversy and sensitivity surrounding the issues that Muholi’s works confront. via artsy.net

Photoset

April 18, 2014 at 11:49 PM

5centsapound:

Zanele Muholi: Of Love & Loss (2014) - Currently showing at Stevenson Gallery in Johannesberg (South Africa) from 14 February - 4 April 2014.

The opening coincides with the presentation of a prestigious Prince Claus Award to Muholi.

Gallery Statement:

In times of increasingly homophobic legislation enacted by African countries and in a climate of intolerance towards homosexuals in the Western world, South Africa distinguishes itself with a Constitution that recognises same-sex marriages; yet the black LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex) community is plagued by hate crimes. Black lesbians are particularly vulnerable and are regularly victims of brutal murders and ‘curatives rapes’ at the hand of neighbours or ‘friends’.

Since 2013 Muholi has been documenting weddings and funerals in the black LGBTI community in South Africa, joyful and painful events that often seem to go hand in hand. The show features photographs, video works and an installation highlighting how manifestations of sorrow and celebration bear similarities and are occasions to underline the need for a safe space to express individual identities.

As Muholi writes:

Ayanda Magoloza and Nhlanhla Moremi’s wedding in Katlehong took place four months after Duduzile Zozo was murdered in Thokoza. Promise Meyer and Gift Sammone’s wedding in Daveyton took place on 22 December in Daveyton, 15 days after Maleshwane Radebe was buried in Ratanda. Six months earlier, Ziningi and Delisile Ndlela were married in Chesterville, Durban. Many in the area attended the ceremony, blessed the newlywed couple and prayed for them and their children. We long for such blessings as we continue to read about the trials and tribulations that LGBTI persons experience in their churches, where homosexuality is persecuted. In 2014, when South African democracy celebrates its 20 years, it seems more important than ever to raise again our voice against hate crimes and discriminations made towards the LGBTI community.

The exhibition includes also a series of autobiographical images, intimate portraits of Muholi and her partner taken during their travels, a tender counterpoint to the tension still generated in South Africa today by same-sex and interracial relationships.

see her past work here.

(via sneakerfetish)

Photo

April 18, 2014 at 7:59 PM

(Source: mrsinizter, via urbanphilly)